Thursday, 13 December 2012

Mums Can Influence Children's Oral Health, Study Suggests

The British Dental Health Foundation believes a new study showing how a mother's knowledge is key to their child's oral health is a timely reminder of how important their early years are. 

The study3 concluded that mothers who were more able to handle stresses in their environment had children with better oral health. According to the research, mothers with higher maternal factors when their child was three years old resulted in a better oral hygiene for their child, more visits to the dentist and more preventive treatments. 

The research speculated that mothers with better maternal instincts are more attentive to the oral hygiene and dental needs of their children, leading to a reduced risk of tooth decay and gum disease. 

The early years of children's lives are a time of rapid development, none more so than their teeth. Even prior to entering pre-school, a child's learning and understanding is largely based on experiences from within their family and home environment. That is why Chief Executive of the British Dental Health Foundation, Dr Nigel Carter OBE, believes the study reinforces the importance of ensuring good oral health for your child as early as possible. 

Dr Carter said: "The study builds on previous work that suggests mothers have a key role to play when it comes to the development of their child's oral hygiene. What mums should remember is that looking after your baby's oral health starts during pregnancy. 

"Good nutrition for the mother during those nine months is crucial for your baby's teeth to develop correctly. It is also worth knowing that due to hormonal changes your gums may bleed more easily, so the Foundation advises more regular visits to the dentist and a higher level of oral health. 

"It is not just a child's mum who can help their oral health. The responsibility to improve oral health lies with each and every one of us. Poor dental health is constantly being linked with a variety of diseases, while too many people do not visit their dentist as often as recommended. 

"If we can reach out to the non-attenders and encourage them to follow the Foundation's three key messages, of brushing twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste, cutting down how often you have sugary foods and drinks and visiting the dentist regularly there is no reason the oral health of the nation and future generations cannot improve even more." 

The study, published in the Journal of Dental Research, analysed data from a long-term study involving the dental  records of 224 teenagers and questionnaires from their mothers.

What To Expect When Getting A Filling Done.

                                   What to Expect When Getting a Filling Done

When your dentist tells you have a cavity, you really do need a filling to protect the tooth from further decay.

If left unfilled, a cavity will only get worse and the decay could ultimately lead to bone loss. Fortunately, the tooth-filling procedure these days is nearly painless thanks to advances in dentistry. So there’s no reason to avoid getting a filli

ng if your dentist recommends it.

One of the first things to expect when getting a filling is a conversation with your dentist about what type of material should be used. There are many more choices of filling material available today than in the past, and your choice may depend on a combination of appearance, cost and function.

Some options for filling materials include:
Gold. Gold fillings are sturdy and non-corrosive and they can last up to 15 years. Many people like the look of gold fillings, but they can be more expensive than other types of filling.
Amalgam. Silver-coloured amalgam fillings are a mixture of metals including silver, copper, tin and mercury. They’re the most researched dental material and are strong, durable, and inexpensive, however, many people don’t like the look of the silver.
Composite. Fillings made of a tooth-coloured mixtures of glass and resin, composite can match the colour of your teeth, but they are not as durable as metal and may need to be replaced more frequently.
Ceramic. Ceramic fillings are often made of porcelain and they are popular for people who want a natural looking tooth. They are durable, but can be abrasive if they hit up against natural teeth. Your dentist will need to make sure that you are biting correctly and the ceramic crown is smooth in order to prevent tooth wear.
Glass ionomers. These glass and acrylic fillings bond chemically to dental hard tissues and release fluoride slowly over time. They are indicated for low-stress areas and are usually placed on roots or front teeth. They are often used in children as a short-term solution for baby teeth.

When it’s time to fill your cavity, your dentist will first numb the area using local anaesthesia. If you’re very nervous about the procedure, talk to your dentist about options for managing your concerns to help you relax.

Once the area surrounding the cavity is numb, your dentist will remove the decayed tissue using a special dental drill, an air abrasion instrument, or even a laser. The end result is the same—the removal of decayed tissue. The instrument used depends in part on where the tooth decay is and how severe it is. Air abrasion is a relatively new technique in dentistry that involves using a handheld device to spray a tiny stream of aluminium oxide particles onto the area of the tooth to be removed. The particles hit the tooth and blast away the desired amount of tissue without any heat or vibration. Most patients report that the procedure is essentially painless. But if you have a very deep cavity or a cavity in a particularly tricky spot between the teeth, your dentist will probably use the dental drill.

Once the decayed material is removed, your dentist will clean out any debris and place the filling in the cavity. If the cavity is deep, your dentist may place a liner over the cavity before placing the filling to protect the tooth nerve.

When the filling is in place, your dentist will clean and polish it and send you on your way. Your lips and gum area may be numb for the first few hours, so chew food carefully and avoid chewing on the part of your mouth where the filling is located. Some tooth sensitivity is normal during the first few weeks after a filling. You might also want to avoid triggers, such as extremely hot or cold foods. If the sensitivity persists after a few weeks, contact your dentist. And if you feel pain in the tooth when biting, see your dentist as soon as possible—you may need to have the filling reshaped.

Don’t worry if you feel some pain or sensitivity in teeth that are next to the filled tooth. This “referred pain” is the nerves in the filled tooth sending pain signals to other teeth. It is normal and should subside within a week or two.

After you’ve received a filling, take good care of it. Follow a regular oral health routine of twice daily tooth brushing (preferably with a fluoride toothpaste) and daily flossing. And be sure to see your dentist for regular checkups—you may not notice when your filling starts to wear down, but your dentist will be able to notice this and also find any weak spots during a checkup. If your filling breaks or falls out, see your dentist immediately so it can be repaired or replaced.

Article published by Oral B